shíshálh Nation | Sechelt, British Columbia, Canada

News, Events & Announcements

Browse through this page for latest news, upcoming events and announcements from The Sechelt (shíshálh) First Nation. Note: For department specific news and announcements, please check out each department's dedicated pages.
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Sakinaw Lake Sockeye - Stock Assessment Smolt Emigration Bulletin #3

Date Posted: 2017-05-23

An estimated 721 sockeye spawned in Sakinaw lake in 2015. Using the average natural smolts per spawner from the previous 3 years, we are expecting approximately 5,800 natural origin smolts leaving the lake in 2017.

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COUNTDOWN to this Upcoming Event:

Notice of shíshálh Nation General Meeting

Date Posted: 2017-07-24 18:00 pm

The shíshálh Nation Council, pursuant to section 14, of division (2), part 2 of the Sechelt Indian band Constitution, give notice that a general meeting will be held on Monday, July 24, 2017, commencing at 6:00 pm, at the shíshálh Nation Community Hall, 5532 Xenichen Avenue.

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Sakinaw Lake Sockeye - Stock Assessment Smolt Emigration Bulletin #2

Date Posted: 2017-05-15

total of 329,077 fry from the Rosewall Creek Hatchery Captive Brood Program were released to Sakinaw Lake in 2016. From average hatchery fry to smolt survival rates in the past 7 years, we expect approximately 40,550 hatchery smolts leaving the lake in 2017.

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 Museum offers face-to-face encounter with 4,000-year-old Indigenous family

Museum offers face-to-face encounter with 4,000-year-old Indigenous family

Date Posted: 2017-05-11
Source: CBC News

The Canadian Museum of History has unveiled a unique new exhibit that brings the faces of a 4,000-year-old Indigenous family back to life.

The museum revealed the three-dimensional forensic reconstruction of a shíshálh family whose remains were found in an ancient burial site near what is now Sechelt, B.C. The digital images move and blink in the incredibly life-like display.

"To look back on some of our people that existed within our territory 4,000 years ago, and to be in close proximity of their images — it's a humbling experience," Chief Warren Paull of the shíshálh Nation told CBC News.

The project was a three-year collaboration between the museum, the shíshálh Nation and the University of Toronto. 

At the request of the community, archeologists from the museum and U of T helped excavated the site, where they unearthed the remains of three adult males and an adult female, along with an infant.

"This exhibit is incredibly important. It represents perhaps the the wealthiest and most important family in North America 4,000 years ago that we've been able to identify," said Mark O'Neill, president and CEO of the Canadian Museum of History. 
"We've been able to work with the community's descendents to make sure that we have conserved and presented, interpreted the story of this family properly."

The exhibit will be a key part of the museum's new Canadian History Hall, set to open July 1. It will have a major focus on Indigenous history as it helped shape modern Canada.

The family's remains have been returned to the community in B.C.
"I think they'd be proud that people took the time to bring them back, and for them to tell us their story. I think it's a way forward," said Paull.

Please checkout this website for further information.

Source: CBC News

 Chief Warren Paull of the shíshálh Nation says his community is honoured by the project. (CBC)
 The new exhibit of the shíshálh family will be part of the Canadian Museum of History's new Canadian History Hall. (CBC)
 A 3D forensic facial reconstruction of a shíshálh chief who lived nearly 4,000 years ago now on display at the Canadian Museum of History. (Philippe Froesch, Visual Forensic)
 A 3D forensic facial reconstruction of a shíshálh woman who lived nearly 4,000 years ago. She was buried with thousands of stone and shell beads, some of which were beaded into her hair. (Philippe Froesch, Visual Forensic)
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 Faces of 4,000-year-old indigenous family come to life in new exhibit

Faces of 4,000-year-old indigenous family come to life in new exhibit

Date Posted: 2017-05-11
Author: CTVNews.ca Staff
Source: CTV News

The Canadian Museum of History is preparing to open a unique exhibit that weaves together ancient remains with modern-day technology to bring the faces of a 4,000-year-old indigenous family to life.

The exhibit features a 3D digital reconstruction of the faces of an ancient family from the shíshálh Nation, whose remains were found in a burial site near what is now Sechelt, B.C.

Archeologists from the Museum of History and the University of Toronto helped excavate the burial site over several years, unearthing the 4,000-year-old remains of five people: a man around the age of 50; a female in her late teens or early 20s; male twins in their early 20s; and one infant whose gender couldn’t be determined.

They had been buried with hundreds of thousands of stone and shell beads that may have decorated a long-gone article of clothing, suggesting the family had “tremendous wealth and power,” the museum said. The museum noted the site was one of the most significant chiefly burial finds in North America.

Over the course of three years, the museum collaborated with the shíshálh Nation and a forensic CGI studio to produce scientifically accurate reconstructions of each of the faces, including their hair, jewellery, facial expressions and clothing.

The results will be unveiled to the public July 1 in the museum’s newly built Canadian History Hall. The new hall traces Canada’s history from the dawn of human life in the country to present day, and includes a major focus on indigenous history.

After being extensively studied at the Museum of History, the remains of the individuals were returned to Sechelt for reburial.

Another version of the 3D module is being constructed for the Tems Swiya Museum in Sechelt, so that those in the ancient family’s home community can view the results as well.

Please checkout this website for further information.

Source: CTV News

 Shishalh Nation elder James Dixon with the digital facial reconstruction of a shishalh family at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Que. (courtesy Canadian Museum of History)
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Unveiling the Collaborative Project

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Collaborative project brings shíshálh Nation face-to-face with ancient ancestors

Date Posted: 2017-05-10

On July 1, the Canadian Museum of History will open its new signature gallery, the Canadian History Hall, which will present the story of Canada and its people more inclusively and candidly than ever before.

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Healing The Future


Episode: 203 Date: 2016-02-15

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